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Discussion Starter #1
Why don't schools teach cursive writing anymore?

How are the youth of today going to sign their names on official documents?

Printing your name isn't the same as a signature.
 

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What I've heard is that more and more of student communications and adult communications are via technology. And knowing how to use technology to communicate and to write was most critical for students.

I think it's a mistake. Hand written communications will always be important.

This reminds me of the grossly mistaken concept that there is no need to teach math to children because they can now use calculators.

Many people misunderstand the place of technology in society.
 

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Learning to write is important. Learning cursive is antiquated. I print frequently, but besides my signature, haven't written in cursive in 30 years. For signing things, we can come up with an alternative that doesn't teach the equivalent of hieroglyphics.

Just about everyone's cursive is the least legible form of written communication they use. Time to let it die.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Then, how do you propose people sign documents? Everyone printing their names? What about verifying signatures, as is practiced now re someone's cursive signature?
 

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Learning to write is important. Learning cursive is antiquated. I print frequently, but besides my signature, haven't written in cursive in 30 years. For signing things, we can come up with an alternative that doesn't teach the equivalent of hieroglyphics.

Just about everyone's cursive is the least legible form of written communication they use. Time to let it die.
Most people don't write cursive (not me, I write in cursive all the time and I take pride in my penmanship). However, learning cursive benefits students in a myriad of ways--even though you don't use cursive anymore, you are still benefited throughout your life by having learned cursive when you were a child.

Children who learn cursive have better fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination than those who don't. They develop better verbal skills and a stronger grasp of language. Learning cursive stimulate synapses that increase and improve communication between the right and left brain, which lends itself to higher, more complex cognitive function. This is just a sample of the benefits, which aren't easily replicated, if at all, by any other learned skill.

Learning cursive and learning it well literally makes that person more developed and evolved than someone who hasn't learned cursive.

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Being left-handed and taught (tortured) to write cursive in parochial school was enough to inform my why it Is unnecessary. Sure, one should at least have a signature, but beyond that typing skills will get you much further.

I still have nightmare of being hit in the knuckles because my loops were angled the wrong way and my writing was just too messy.
 

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Being left-handed and taught (tortured) to write cursive in parochial school was enough to inform my why it Is unnecessary. Sure, one should at least have a signature, but beyond that typing skills will get you much further.

I still have nightmare of being hit in the knuckles because my loops were angled the wrong way and my writing was just too messy.
Was it a penguin?
 

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Most people don't write cursive (not me, I write in cursive all the time and I take pride in my penmanship). However, learning cursive benefits students in a myriad of ways--even though you don't use cursive anymore, you are still benefited throughout your life by having learned cursive when you were a child.

Children who learn cursive have better fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination than those who don't. They develop better verbal skills and a stronger grasp of language. Learning cursive stimulate synapses that increase and improve communication between the right and left brain, which lends itself to higher, more complex cognitive function. This is just a sample of the benefits, which aren't easily replicated, if at all, by any other learned skill.

Learning cursive and learning it well literally makes that person more developed and evolved than someone who hasn't learned cursive.

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk
SNORT
(going back to my cave)
 

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I had a lifetime career in service & repair. Upon retirement, I became a substitute teacher for something to do.

The students all use chromebooks. In the chromebooks is a program known as Schoology. Through Schoology the teachers post assignments and the students complete them which the teacher can monitor their progress.

During one class I was subbing for, the teacher logged in and could tell who was working on their assignments and who was goofing off. It was funny to see all the kids scramble when the teacher sent a class wide notice that they had better get to work.

If the teacher does have a paper assignment for me to handout, the first thing the students ask for are pencils. I've learned to keep a bunch in my briefcase. If they are asked to write something such as an essay, then they'll ask for paper and pencils. Those are things the students rarely use today and they certainly don't carry them in their backpacks. But you count on them having their chromebooks, smartphones and an assortment of chargers with them.

So yes, things have changed a lot. We live in a digital world. As I'm pushing 70, if I was asked to write a two page essay on paper, I'd probably get writer's cramp after the first paragraph and you wouldn't be able to tell what I wrote either. My handwriting skills have definitely degraded through the years, but I am a pretty good typist.

But you do have a valid question. On most papers the students hand in, their name is written in print format, not cursive. When one 3rd grade class handed in their work, I left a note to the teacher that if she could actually read their names then that was certainly her superpower.

They must learn how do their signature at some point as you say, they are going to need it.
 

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My children were taught just enough cursive in school to legally sign their name to something. Of course, now, in their late teens and early 20's, it still looks like a child's signature but it's easy to identify it as theirs. The main reason it's not taught in my area is that it's no something that is on the standardized tests. They spent 3 weeks on it and then moved on to something else in third grade. My youngest got extra credit for completing a typing skills class online on her own time though. My older two had no typing instruction. They all type beautifully and very fast though...it's just the nature of social media today. The class I took in high school that has been without a doubt the most beneficial to me in the course of my life was Typing I. Still use what I learned today and many of my colleague's are jealous of my skills. I can chart on my patients faster than any of my coworkers. I sign my name anywhere from 1-30 times a day and nobody can read what I've written. LOL
 

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I abandoned cursive as a teenager, too hard to read. I believe cursive is supposed to be faster, though it never was for me. If people today spend markedly less time writing, they aren't going to save that much time by learning a faster style of writing. wrt signatures, a number of people I know who grew up learning cursive don't bother w/ any meaningful attempts at signing their names. I guess you could teach people how to write just their name cursively, but I don't think there is any legal requirement for a signature to be cursive vs. printed, I think it is still legal to sign "X".
 

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My kids started in Montessori, so they were taught cursive before print. My older two were writing in cursive at 3 and 4 years old and still choose cursive over print. The school they are in now focuses far more on typing and computer/tablet use than their Montessori school but that cursive foundation has really helped them.

In school, cursive is never used anymore and even printing is barely used. Unless my kids are doing something like labeling a map or filling out a family tree, they do not use pen and paper. Nearly everything is done on their tablets or on the computer and submitted to their Google Classrooms. So schools focus on the skills kids need and will get more use out of. Not saying I agree with that, but it's just the way it is.

I can't recall a single time I ever had to print or write something at work but I was typing all the time. My wife is a nurse and some of the places she worked had just started going electronic and paperless two years ago. Others were years ahead and some still haven't. So what skills are more needed/used at work would depend on the job and location.

People can learn to sign their name without being able to write anything else. My great-grandfather didn't learn to read or write and always signed things with an X. Eventually that wasn't allowed and he learned to sign his name (poorly) but couldn't write or read anything else. So while an extreme example, someone can sign their name without knowing cursive - or even how to read or print.

I frequently write in cursive. It's my preference and I get a lot of compliments on it but my signature is a scribble. I write my first initial then scribble, then my second and scribble.
 

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Then, how do you propose people sign documents? Everyone printing their names? What about verifying signatures, as is practiced now re someone's cursive signature?
verifying signatures! i was previously in banking and no one did it in 2004; I routinely signed checks and forms as Micky Mouse; no one has noticed.

I do print my name & info correctly
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Okay, I see everyone's point.

I tried to teach my high schooler to write his name in cursive to sign things, and it's a big fail. His signature looks like he's in elementary school 😲

People used to write important documents in such beautiful cursive! Now, that art is gone...
 
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