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Unfortunately, I feel like this is an example of the old bait-and-switch. When your relationship started, she did a lot of smiling and nodding when you spoke of travel plans for the two of you. She probably liked you, wanted to build a life with you, and didn't want to do anything that would jeopardize that. So, she lied and pretended to have an interest. Then, when you got married, she did the ole switcheroo. Happened to me too, but with different issues, and it really, really sucks. A lot of people out there think that this is THE way to behave, when it's not; it's so much better to just be up-front and honest.
Lots of people will buy a house with plans as to what they will change about it, which is fine since it doesn't have any preference over what it is vs. what you plan. But too many people will get married with this in mind, and that is indefensible.
 

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I like to travel but 4-5months out of the year with a daughter… yea I don’t think so. You want her to leave her life and follow your dreams. What about her life?

You two need to compromise, and you need to kiss that 4-5 months a year dream goodbye, unless your daughter is an adult.
 

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You are looking for ideas about how to still travel with your spouse (and child), who hate travelling... Ok, so I have some ideas, but first I have questions for you to ponder:

(1) what is it about travel that your spouse really hates? Uncomfortable sleeping in strange beds? Afraid to try foods that are not familiar? Uneasy not being able to speak the local language? what?

So the first idea is to truly recognize, understand, and appreciate exactly why your spouse hates travel. You say you've tried to make travel as comfortable as you can for your spouse, but if you don't really know exactly what the problem actually is, how can you address it? The complaints she makes may only be superficial, and masking what is really bothering her, so trying to address the superficial complaints may not be effective. Dig deeper into this. It requires empathy...

(2) what is it about travel that really drives you? Seeing different landscapes? Experiencing different cultures? Eating exotic foods? what?

The second idea is to truly recognize and understand what exactly it is that you are trying to get from travel -- what is it about travel that triggers that dopamine rush (or whatever)? Once you really have a handle on that, then maybe you could look for ways to get that experience without having to travel very far from home at all. I mean, how much do you really know about the place and culture(s) of the area where you live? Have you visited all of the parks, museums, cultural facilities, restaurants, etc... in your area? attended all the events on the calendar? spent time meeting and talking to people from varied neighborhoods? Maybe there is a ton of adventure to be had right in your own backyard, which your spouse might even be amenable to joining in on!
 

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I completely understand you. I'm nomadic, so travel is my lifestyle.

If it were me, I'd sit her down and have an honest, frank conversation with her.

Consider telling her that you'd love to travel with her, doing things that you'd both enjoy, but if she'd truly rather not go, then you'll simply go on your own.

You can't force her to like traveling, but you can go without her.

Maybe if she gets left a few times, (meaning you follow through), then perhaps she'll change her mind. If she doesn't, then at least you can enjoy your trips without the complaints.
I think this is a great answer. I'm no fan of travel (and no I'm not xenophobic or racist, LOL!)

But the OP is, and he made that clear prior to marriage. Though I wonder if she had any idea how MUCH travel he had in mind.

Regardless, I know what it is like to drag a reluctant spouse around. They act like they're doing you some huge favor by accompanying you, and then proceed to ruin the trip for everyone with their piss poor attitude.

I think leaving her home IS a real option. I don't think it's good for a marriage to be apart like that, but it's also not good to lead your future spouse on with how you'll be once married, then change. And reluctantly going along is expensive drudgery for all.

ONE IDEA - I know it's not the same, but maybe there are thing OP can do locally to satisfy some craving for experiencing different cultures ? Like check out restaurants and events with different ethnic themes?
 

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I'm hoping once the pandemic has calmed down and it's safer to travel, I'm going to renew my passport and spend a couple of years travelling. My kids are all grown up now and my 1st and only marriage is over. Where would you suggest the safest countries would be for a female travelling alone? Aiming on spending up to 2-3 months in each country. One place I want to go is Amsterdam haha, but would probably spend 2-4 weeks there. You should find one of your friends or find someone who would travel with you if your wife isn't interested. She did know your hobbies and interests before marrying you. Maybe see if she is OK with going on shorter travels with you but more frequently, so not away too long at once.

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