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How much wealth or income would it take for you to feel that you're "rich"? This conversation came up at dinner over the holidays and I was amazed at the variation.
 

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Obviously depends on where you live. San Francisco etc vs rural America is completely different.
And I think you got the amazing variation due to peoples definitions of "rich". What some consider rich others would find simply ok or "well to do". There are some who have very high standards for what constitutes "rich".
 

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To feel rich, I really wouldn't need much more income/assets than I already have. As a benchmark, I would definitely feel rich if I could afford to fly first class whenever I travel, without thinking twice!
 

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Money would never make me feel rich I don’t believe. Anyone who wants to give me a million to test the theory is more than welcome. :D

Friends and loved ones who are loyal would.

Monetarily It’s been shown in studies people who amass $$$ fortunes Think they will be happy or feel well off at a certain point and once they reach that point they set another one. Basically it’s never enough.
 

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Being rich means you can pay people to do the things that you don’t want to so you can spend your time doing whatever you enjoy doing.
I know some very wealthy people and this is the answer you get when the topic of having money comes up in conversation.
 

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If you want to know just how rich you are, on a world-scale:

Global Rich List

It really "hit home" to me when I went to the mission field the first time at age 32. Wow. I was indeed quite rich compared to most of those folks.
 

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I grew up very poor by US standards but we never went hungry like many people do in the world.

Today my husband and I have very little money according to most people's standards but we do just fine. We both went to college and that has made our lives much "richer". I am not really preoccupied with "what is rich" to be honest and have no interest in throwing numbers around if that's what is sought.
 

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I wrote this on another thread about wealth but I think it’s worth repeating.
When I was younger I had a job that paid an absolute fortune but also entailed a lot of travel.I traveled to Dubai almost every week and I met an English woman and we had a fwb relationship for a while. This relationship continued when she returned to live in England.
She asked me once would I attend a wedding with her in her family’s home village. It was a relative who was getting married and the plan was to stay at her parents and return to London the day after the wedding.
I stayed with her on the Thursday night and on Friday we set off on the train to get to her parents place. We changed trains twice and we ended up at a very rural station where I heard her asking the guy in charge “Did Daddy call”. He said yes and she slipped him some money.
I asked her what was going on and she said there was a disused station on her fathers land and arrangements had been made for the train to stop and let us out and her fathers chauffeur would be waiting to bring us to the house.
This guy was so wealthy and owned so much land he had his own private station!
 

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We can live on very little as neither of us are that bothered about 'things'. We could live happily on about £16,000-£17,000 a year(about $20,000) bearing in mind our mortgage is paid off.
 

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I don't think the word "rich" is very useful.

"Comfortable" may be a better term - taken literally. I feel "comfortably wealth" because I have enough money saved that even if I lost my job, I could continue my life with everything I need, including things to make me happy, just with a reduction of luxuries.
 

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Our washer and dryer broke unexpectedly about a month ago. They were still limping along, with a few annoying new traits that meant we had to literally babysit them during the entire wash and dry cycle to help things along. In previous times of our lives, we would just resign ourselves to "well, I guess this is our life now", knowing it would be many months until we could figure out a way to finance a new set to replace them. Especially right before Christmas when we'd already spent all available funds on gifts for our kids.

I was already mentally planning out how the heck we were going to handle the new time commitment our laundry was going to take each week, since we had to be home when the washer and dryer were going and had to be watching it the whole time.

Unlike previous times, the same day they broke we were able to go online and order replacements (that we actually chose because we *liked* them, not because they were the cheapest thing available). Within two days the replacements were installed and old ones removed. Didn't even make a dent in our weekly laundry schedule.

I am still astonished at how easy that was. The fact that we could afford to do that, fix a problem so quickly and effortlessly - I feel like a rich person for sure! In fact, I remember looking at the new washer and dryer and thinking "omg, is this what it feels like to be rich?"

On paper we are solidly middle class. But I am happy at this level. Feeling rich is just as good.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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In the winter of my life, I can have everything I need, albeit not everything I might think I want.
 

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How much wealth or income would it take for you to feel that you're "rich"? This conversation came up at dinner over the holidays and I was amazed at the variation.
@FalCod,

This is an excellent question. I have been "rich" by monetary standards: we owned a million-dollar business, had a custom 4000sqft home on a lot of property with a football field in the front yard for the kids (no, I mean , a standard, 100 yd with goals football field), an Olympic sized pool in the backyard (we invited all the surrounding neighborhood kids to swim at no charge), and a stunning landscaped patio-BBQ pit in the back, had two new cars, had everything money could buy and people at our door with their hand out. BUT my exH was diagnosed bipolar, BPD, NPD and he was abusive physically, mentally, verbally and committed adultery several times. I had all the wealth and income in the world and I was FAR from rich.

In my marriage to Dear Hubby, we were poor (by U.S. standards...not by world standards). Oh we ate every day, had shelter and clothing, and owned an old car (1991), but we had food stamps, we were often hungry or cold, and we struggled to make ends meet. We lived on a cash basis and were not able to replace an item that broke down without saving for months. We didn't live beyond our means, and didn't have debt...but we also just didn't have many of the "comfortable" things either.

Yet I would say that I was FAR, FAR richer with Dear Hubby than I ever was with my exH, because Dear Hubby was a kind and gentle man. He laughed easily and was thoughtful. Being treated in a healthy way was worth SO MUCH MORE than diamonds, rubies or "wealth." Trust me, income does not make a person "rich."

And now with Beloved Hubby, I have been blessed with both a rich and full heart, and monetary comfort of not having to worry about being the sole provider or wondering how we'll pay the next bill. By my definition, we are more RICH now than I would ever have dared hope to be, and the wealth is not from his money (although he has done an amazing job of investing, keeping debt minimal, saving, and being fiscally sound), but rather from the man that he is and way that we love. Truly, I'm not kidding you, being rich has little to do with money, or income, or monetary wealth--it has so much more to do with being the best person you can be, loving another, being kind to those who may not deserve it, being generous and thoughtful, and finding joy in everything in life.

If a person finds joy in the sound of the birds and the scent of a flower, they do not need to be wealthy, and yet they are RICH. If a person has all the money in the world, but can not hear the beauty of children laughing or feel satisfied with homemade bread and soup, then they are poor indeed.
 

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How much wealth or income would it take for you to feel that you're "rich"? This conversation came up at dinner over the holidays and I was amazed at the variation.
I guess my definition of rich would be if I had enough money that I could choose not to work for the rest of my life. Half a million pounds would probably cover it. That obviously doesn't allow luxuries like first class air travel: the luxury it allows is I can simply walk away from a job if I'm not enjoying it. I am pretty sure I would still work.
 

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To me "rich" would be financial independence. To work because I was interested in what I was doing and not mostly because I have the skills and need to pay bills. My research says that requires roughly 25X expenses. @Andy1001 and @kag123's mention of just writing a check to make unpleasant problems to go away is also a good standard. I'll probably pay off my house in 7-10 years and I'll feel rich after that I'm sure.
 
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