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Discussion Starter #1
What are you reading right now? What's in your "to-do" list?

I'm reading a history of the golden age of piracy called "The Republic of Pirates", and listening to an audiobook of "The Stand". I've read it twice but don't have the energy for another go, so I'm having someone else read it to me.
 

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Hell, I just discovered the Mitch Rapp series by Vince Flynn in mid-October and went through all 16 books by January of this year. Burned myself out reading. Haven't picked up a book since.
 
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Right now I'm actively reading The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan and The Preshistory of Sex by Timothy Taylor.

I working my way through The More Beautiful World our Hearts Know is Possible by Charles Eisensten and The Tao Te Ching. Those two books--and other more philosophical books--tend to take me a long time to finish because I read a bit, then digest for awhile before getting back to them.

I have about a half dozen books on my bed side stand that I just pick up and read randomly when I feel like it. Most of them are books I've read before and want to re-read for the fun of it.

I've read The Stand too many times to count. One of my favorites.
 

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Haven't been reading books lately, just short, erotic fiction but after watching "A Wrinkle In Time", I'm going to get the books that wonderful woman Madeleine wrote and read them to Mrs. Conan. I loved them as a child and I am sure she will like them too.

I love "The Stand" and wouldn't mind another go at it.
 

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I <3 books! They've been my constant companions and refuge since I was wee and if I had my druthers my nose would always be buried in a book.

Recent reads:

The Changeling by Victor LaValle
A YA series called The Arcana Chronicles
Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

Next up:

My Favorite Thing is Monsters by Emil Ferris, which is a beautifully illustrated graphic novel set in the 1960s and centers around a child who thinks she's a wolf girl. The amazing artwork is even more impressive considering the author/artist was paralyzed by West Nile virus and had to teach herself to draw again.

I already know I'm going to love it just based on the subject matter and the incredible illustrations. Can't wait! The anticipation of enjoying it is almost as good as actually reading it! Winnie the Pooh summed it up best... "although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were."

I mean, the artwork tho!






Not to mention monsters are one of my favorite things too!
 

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This is a much-needed thread for me. I don't read books. Well, I read cookbooks. Go figure. Twenty years ago, I was a voracious reader. Then I got burned out taking tons of online classes and couldn't stand to pick up a book any longer.

I don't like nonfiction. Today's fiction seems to be so formulaic. No, I don't want to read about an amnesiac heiress who discovers an old diary in the attic. I don't want to read about a ridiculously wealthy family who has a serial murderer in the family line who has been reincarnated as a zombie.

Oh, and I can't stand murder mysteries. Maybe I'm just an old fart, but today's writing strikes me as so bad that I find myself grumbling at the book's characters before getting halfway through.

I love to read, but I need something that is more than the current NYT's best seller genre. Help.
 

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This is a much-needed thread for me. I don't read books. Well, I read cookbooks. Go figure. Twenty years ago, I was a voracious reader. Then I got burned out taking tons of online classes and couldn't stand to pick up a book any longer.

I don't like nonfiction. Today's fiction seems to be so formulaic. No, I don't want to read about an amnesiac heiress who discovers an old diary in the attic. I don't want to read about a ridiculously wealthy family who has a serial murderer in the family line who has been reincarnated as a zombie.

Oh, and I can't stand murder mysteries. Maybe I'm just an old fart, but today's writing strikes me as so bad that I find myself grumbling at the book's characters before getting halfway through.

I love to read, but I need something that is more than the current NYT's best seller genre. Help.
I also am a nonfiction type of person.

Just finished My brothers keeper.

Its an old book I found at my moms after she died . I remeber her talking about it when I was about 12.

Pretty good read.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Haven't been reading books lately, just short, erotic fiction but after watching "A Wrinkle In Time", I'm going to get the books that wonderful woman Madeleine wrote and read them to Mrs. Conan. I loved them as a child and I am sure she will like them too.

I love "The Stand" and wouldn't mind another go at it.
A Wrinkle in Time, Wind in the Door and A Swiftly Tilting Planet were some of my favorite books as a kid. My daughter just informed me the other day there is (at least) a fourth one in the series that I wasn't aware of...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is a much-needed thread for me. I don't read books. Well, I read cookbooks. Go figure. Twenty years ago, I was a voracious reader. Then I got burned out taking tons of online classes and couldn't stand to pick up a book any longer.

I don't like nonfiction. Today's fiction seems to be so formulaic. No, I don't want to read about an amnesiac heiress who discovers an old diary in the attic. I don't want to read about a ridiculously wealthy family who has a serial murderer in the family line who has been reincarnated as a zombie.

Oh, and I can't stand murder mysteries. Maybe I'm just an old fart, but today's writing strikes me as so bad that I find myself grumbling at the book's characters before getting halfway through.

I love to read, but I need something that is more than the current NYT's best seller genre. Help.
Plenty of good stuff from the olden days. Some Louis L'Amour or some H.P. Lovecraft? That stuff still holds up.
 

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I'm just finishing up "Blood's a Rover" by James Ellroy (wrote L.A. Confidential) which complete his "Underworld USA" trilogy. It is written in the same clipped style as the previous entry as the previous book, "The Cold Six Thousand", though not quite to the same extent. I'm greatly enjoying so far.
 

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A Wrinkle in Time, Wind in the Door and A Swiftly Tilting Planet were some of my favorite books as a kid. My daughter just informed me the other day there is (at least) a fourth one in the series that I wasn't aware of...
"Many Waters" and "An Acceptable Time" are also part of that series.

Madeleine had another series of books that might have had cross over characters as well.
 

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Not to mention monsters are one of my favorite things too!
My daughter has a fascination with monsters, and depictions of monsters. I think she'd love that graphic novel--thanks for the recommendation. She loves to draw monsters as well. She's a fan of John Kenn Mortensen.

This is a much-needed thread for me. I don't read books. Well, I read cookbooks. Go figure. Twenty years ago, I was a voracious reader. Then I got burned out taking tons of online classes and couldn't stand to pick up a book any longer.

I don't like nonfiction. Today's fiction seems to be so formulaic. No, I don't want to read about an amnesiac heiress who discovers an old diary in the attic. I don't want to read about a ridiculously wealthy family who has a serial murderer in the family line who has been reincarnated as a zombie.

Oh, and I can't stand murder mysteries. Maybe I'm just an old fart, but today's writing strikes me as so bad that I find myself grumbling at the book's characters before getting halfway through.

I love to read, but I need something that is more than the current NYT's best seller genre. Help.
I've been disappointed in contemporary fiction for quite some time now, too. I've retreated to classic literary fiction, for the most part, and also read a lot more non fiction.

I do like murder mysteries, I have to admit. The classic form (a la Christie and G.K. Chesterton, for example), but also longer, more literary murder mysteries. Iaan Pears' Stone's Fall and An Instance of the Fingerpost were well written page-turners.

I'm not sure what kind of fiction you admire, but I need artful mastery of language and nuanced character development. John Steinbeck always hits the spot for me. I find East of Eden almost unbearably gorgeous. I feel the same about Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Those are books that transcend reading for entertainment--they actually move me.

I read Charles ****ens and Mark Twain just for the sheer delight of their mastery of language.

I've read hundred of books that were entertaining enough--but they just don't stick with me. I consider them sort of like watching TV. That's how most contemporary fiction strikes me. Not all, but a lot of it.
 

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I'm currently reading both the 5th edition of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) and Rita Mulcahy's PMP Exam Prep. Honestly, the PMBOK is the single most boring thing I've ever read. And I have a degree in dirt, so I know a little something about boring.

Also, just for fun, I'm reading a historical romance series by Heather Graham. It's not great literature, but it's fairly well-written fun and makes a nice diversion from the suck that is my required reading.

My next book will be a non-fictionalized account of the end of the Plantagenet dynasty called The Wars of the Roses, by Dan Jones that I picked up a couple months ago but haven't had a chance to start yet. I'm a huge Medieval history buff.
 

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I'm currently reading both the 5th edition of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) and Rita Mulcahy's PMP Exam Prep. Honestly, the PMBOK is the single most boring thing I've ever read. And I have a degree in dirt, so I know a little something about boring. :laugh:

Also, just for fun, I'm reading a historical romance series by Heather Graham. It's not great literature, but it's fairly well-written fun and makes a nice diversion from the suck that is my required reading.

My next book will be a non-fictionalized account of the end of the Plantagenet dynasty called The Wars of the Roses, by Dan Jones that I picked up a couple months ago but haven't had a chance to start yet. I'm a huge Medieval history buff.
PMP Guidebook... what fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm currently reading both the 5th edition of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) and Rita Mulcahy's PMP Exam Prep. Honestly, the PMBOK is the single most boring thing I've ever read. And I have a degree in dirt, so I know a little something about boring. :laugh:

Also, just for fun, I'm reading a historical romance series by Heather Graham. It's not great literature, but it's fairly well-written fun and makes a nice diversion from the suck that is my required reading.

My next book will be a non-fictionalized account of the end of the Plantagenet dynasty called The Wars of the Roses, by Dan Jones that I picked up a couple months ago but haven't had a chance to start yet. I'm a huge Medieval history buff.
Don't ever let anyone make you feel bad about reading whatever kind of fiction that scratches your itch. Virtually all of the fictions that are now considered "classics" were dismissed as mind-rotting garbage when they were written. I suspect that this trend will continue.

On Wuthering Heights: “How a human being could have attempted such a book as the present without committing suicide before he had finished a dozen chapters, is a mystery. It is a compound of vulgar depravity and unnatural horrors.” — Graham’s Lady’s Magazine, 1848

On The Catcher in the Rye: “This Salinger, he’s a short story guy. And he knows how to write about kids. This book though, it’s too long. Gets kind of monotonous. And he should’ve cut out a lot about these jerks and all that crumby school. They depress me.” — James Stern, The New York Times, 1951
 

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Don't ever let anyone make you feel bad about reading whatever kind of fiction that scratches your itch. Virtually all of the fictions that are now considered "classics" were dismissed as mind-rotting garbage when they were written. I suspect that this trend will continue.
Oh, no shame here. I read a lot. Of everything. It just happens that I also read pretty good number of historical and/or paranormal romance novels. Not as many as I used to, but I'll still grab one from time to time. As I said, they're light and fun and frivolous, and a nice diversion from more serious pursuits.
 

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Oh, no shame here. I read a lot. Of everything. It just happens that I also read pretty good number of historical and/or paranormal romance novels. Not as many as I used to, but I'll still grab one from time to time. As I said, they're light and fun and frivolous, and a nice diversion from more serious pursuits.
I've had people actually try to bag on my choices of books before for reading things that are too frivolous. Like really? You can't find something to be grumpier about? I mean--you asked ME what I was reading why exactly?

I think those are the kind of people that secretly like peeing on flowers and kicking puppies.
 
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