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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
These are just some reflections after watching Basic Instinct.-Ron:smthumbup:
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Part 1:

I think I’ve watched more movies since I retired from FT work in 1999, PT work in 2001 and casual-volunteer work in 2005. I don’t attend as many meetings for my job, for some volunteer organization or for the Baha’i Faith which I have been associated with since 1953. Most of the movies I watch now are after I have finished my day of writing and editing, publishing and poetizing, researching and scholarship, a bit of domestic work and the occasional social activity. My wife has usually gone to bed, and I watch the movie during and after my late night snack.

The beautiful Sharon Stone was on the other night(1) in Basic Instinct 2. I was 14 when she was born and was just about to join the Baha’i Faith. I was 35 when she made her movie debut in 1980 and was stabilized on lithium for my bi-polar disorder. I was nearly 50 when Stone hit the jack-pot in 1992’s Basic Instinct opposite Michael Douglas. Our lives could not be much different, although there are points of comparison which I find is true with just about everyone.-Ron Price with thanks to (1)SBS2 TV, 24 September 2011.

Part 2:

So you’re into Buddhism and the
Universal Life Church as you make
your way through your 50s now---
as one of the sexiest movie stars,
one of the best actresses & money
spinners: not caring whether people
like you, not having to prove anything
anymore…you were quoted as saying.

Yes, I agree with you that we are each
an amalgam of our relationships in life.
I’ve had my life in the fast-lane, Sharon,
not as fast or as popular as you, but it
was quite enough to keep me as busy
as a beaver until my recent retirement.

I am now done with risk-taking except
a little here and there on the internet
at sites where I post my writing & chat
with others about my ideas and theirs.

Ron Price
29/9/’11
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PS Watching this Sharon Stone movie raised some questions in my mind which I will discuss below in this thread now that some responses have come in.
 

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Yes, sharon stone and other Hollywood characters are very intriguing, but to say the truth Holliwood is or become a 'ulcera' for the art in general.
Before Hollywood and America had 'space' for strong or genial individual in Europe and other places.
Unless the efforts and persons from above winned the american spirit,cherry red, or basic instinct of another Sharon an very old memory that she act in life and movies.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I loved Sharon Stone!
I always wondered what happened to her, never knew she was bipolar.

My favourite with here was Casino.

I do remember looking at Basic Instinct, but I can't recall the plot ATM.
 

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I don't think S. Stone was in Tombstone. She was in Total Recall about the same time, and had one of the best roles in the movie - a true femme fatale.

Dana Delaney and her killer smile were in Tombstone. :)
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I don't think S. Stone was in Tombstone. She was in Total Recall about the same time, and had one of the best roles in the movie - a true femme fatale.

Dana Delaney and her killer smile were in Tombstone. :)
Yes.
Lol,
My mistake!
And I think G.I Jane was Demi Moore and not Sharon Stone?

I will correct it.
 

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I was 14 when Basic Instinct came out and I thought Sharon Stone was the hottest thing! I saw the movie after it came out on video and the leg crossing scene did a number on me. At that age I often fantasized about those legs wrapped around me. :)
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I won't respond to all those comments about Stone and her movies, but I will comment on some psychological problems.-Ron
-----------------
Part 1:

When faced with negative behaviors, where does one draw the line between the genuinely and the conveniently negative? Is there any way to differentiate between these two possibilities? It's difficult to accept as valid an airy, dismissive "oh I can't help myself; I'm bipolar" when all one's instincts are crying "foul!" and telling us we should not do such things.

Some psychiatrists like to say that psychological disorders, as they are defined in the DSM-V constitute the only nosology (medical categorization system) without clear etiologies (neurological causation). Research in neuroscience is gradually moving toward the point when some of those etiologies will be more apparent. However, for the time being, I don't think that there is any way to state definitively one way or the other. And so, for the moment, many personal proclivities which are better counteracted, do not have a scientific basis. They are just considered culturally inappropriate by some.

Part 2:

I thank Mark A. Foster, Ph.D. and The MarkFoster.NETwork Publications Portal for the above. And I'll end with a quotation:

"... the modern challenge is how to live with uncertainty. The
basic fault lines today are not between people with different
beliefs but between people who hold these beliefs with an
element of uncertainty and people who hold these beliefs with
a pretense of certitude." — Peter L. Berger, sociologist
 
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