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Bravo to you for getting a job and living on your own! You can't be supportive of another until you can pull your own weight.

I am in an intercultural relationship. It's wonderful, but like everything else it has a price, and the more aware you are of what it is the better. I also worked in multinational settings and saw diplomatic couples from a variety of backgrounds. You'll have daily challenges you would not know about because you've lived in a country where there are relatively few ethnic and cultural groups. You'll have vastly different assumptions about certain things while you may instinctively agree on many others: family, how to spend money, can you spank your kid with the thickest wooden spoon in the kitchen, what is ethical behavior, how clean should the bathroom be, is it polite to bite into a piece of food and put it back onto the plate (in my own culture it is permissible, not so in the West), whether her entire clan should live with you, whether a woman should have her own friends and social life or cling to you her entire day, whether you are allowed to have women friends, what constitutes aggressive behavior. To top it off it will take you several years to fully understand and communicate with each other, since English is not native to either of you.

Someone American I know married a Ukranian and brought her here. He complains endlessly that she has not adjusted to life here, that she throws the flowers he gives her back at him, and that she should just tough up and take all the discrimination and difficulty she confronts here because that's just life. I felt compelled to point out to him that she is here in part for his sake. He is by this point so resentful he no longer cares, but declares that it was her decision as well and she should take full responsibility. I told him that as a white American man it is very difficult for him to understand how it is for people who do not feel that they are automatically accepted and respected, but he is adamant. I ask him to think back to the days when they first fell in love, and to try to understand her in that light. He refuses. Such is the tragedy of our condiiton as puny humans who take on more than we can bear.

I don't want to scare you. On the flip side, I love my husband's European relatives and friends. They are so different and interesting. I love his experience in France and how that makes him funnier and more urbane. He likes my effortless healthy habits as an Asian, the fact that our culture values long-term bonds, and the perspective I have on life where I am less impatient and take a longer view than most people living here. But you must be aware of these things before you promise to take them on.

These relatioships are inverted - the cart before the horse. Most people invest in relationships only after they've gotten a chance to make a full evaluation. In these cases, you often must commit to the person and vice versa in a big way before you even see them, spending a lot of money, having them put their lives/careers on hold or changed because of you, having them change their land of allegiance. It's a big deal. It would be much better if you can get them to agree beforehand that they are doing it for their own sake, because they want to for other reasons, besides you.

I suggest you look up forums where they talk about visas for fiances - there are many in the US and I am sure some in Germany and Switzerland, for example. You can learn a lot there.
 

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Heck, I'll be extra brutal and point out an immutable fact: be aware that she is from a far poorer country than you, and that may represent all kinds of problems down the road.

Just as you are much less likely to hook up with someone who is absolutely indigent, you should think hard about that disparity. Money, or the lack of it, taints relationships very quickly.

I am not accusing her of chasing money. I am merely saying that we should remove the consideration of money from our relationships whenever we can. People in developing countries often have unrealistic expectations about life here. Trust me, I used to have them. When I first moved to the West I expected to live like the people in Dallas, that trashy soap show. I was stunned that we did not have huge vistas attached to our estate which a helicopter can fly over.

You'd better clear all that from this relationship every chance you get. Be honest and open. Let her know where you and your family are in life, economically. Always make it clear that you would like a partner who can support you in life, unless you can be sure that you have the ability to be the sole breadwinner and take delight in the fact. Don't overpromise her.
 
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