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Anyone else a humidity freak like myself? I live in a place with really cold long winters, and in a very old (but gorgeous) apartment building that’s really drafty. I get free heat so I caulk my windows and blast the heat In every room. I like the temp to be around 70-72.

I have a hygrometer in every room. My apartment is 900 square feet and I have 2 humidifiers going constantly. Sometimes the humidity level is fine, but it’s usually low, right now its reading 25 which is really dry.

I am very sensitive to humidity. I use to get a bloody nose at least daily until I got my humidifiers. I also have dry skin which I do everything from my end with good successes

I wake up in the morning.... and refill my humidifiers. I constantly filter water with my small brita jug thing through out the day. I have multiple glass bottles that I put the filtered water in because I can never keep up.

My question is... do I need another humidifier? Is there anyway I can have normal humidity while running the heat so high? Any other humidity freaks out there with tips and tricks?
 

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I live in a place that's so humid the walls will mildew if the furniture is pushed too close and laundry sours on the line long before it gets close to being dry.

You could always move somewhere warmer and more humid. But, failing that, try another humidifier, or turn the heat down a bit and wear more clothes indoors.

Also, make very sure that you're actually drinking enough of all that water you're filtering. External humidity can't make up for internal dehydration.
 

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Anyone else a humidity freak like myself? I live in a place with really cold long winters, and in a very old (but gorgeous) apartment building that’s really drafty. I get free heat so I caulk my windows and blast the heat In every room. I like the temp to be around 70-72.

I have a hygrometer in every room. My apartment is 900 square feet and I have 2 humidifiers going constantly. Sometimes the humidity level is fine, but it’s usually low, right now its reading 25 which is really dry.

I am very sensitive to humidity. I use to get a bloody nose at least daily until I got my humidifiers. I also have dry skin which I do everything from my end with good successes

I wake up in the morning.... and refill my humidifiers. I constantly filter water with my small brita jug thing through out the day. I have multiple glass bottles that I put the filtered water in because I can never keep up.

My question is... do I need another humidifier? Is there anyway I can have normal humidity while running the heat so high? Any other humidity freaks out there with tips and tricks?
Radiators for heat? If so, put pots of water on top. A shallow pan might work better, though.
 

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I live in a cold desert, high altitude. I'm a bit of a weather geek. Dad was a meteorologist.
So Cold air can't hold as much water (vapor) as hot air. Keeping your apartment at 72 is not the problem. Drafty is the problem. What you are doing is bringing in cold dry air, heating it and humidifying it, and hoping to benefit from it before it leaks back out of the building. For this reason radiant heat would work better for you than forced air. (i didn't catch which you had) Caulking the windows was a good thing. With free heat you don't want to buy extra heat so you are kind of stuck with what the building has.
Some things from my first aid training and raising kids in the desert: In the winter warm liquids are important. Hot drinks and hot soup. It has a double benefit. You ingest the water, and you breath the vapor and steam as you eat. This really helps with that nose. But, caffeine dehydrates you. (sugar also) If you can cut back on it your personal hydration will improve. Also get your electrolytes. If you feel like you are drinking and peeing all the time but are still thirsty, you probably aren't getting your electrolytes. Like gatorade or powerade, especially the low calorie options. BTW the orange one tastes ok Warmed. (my grandmother would have thrown in a clove)
 

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I live in a cold desert, high altitude. I'm a bit of a weather geek. Dad was a meteorologist.
So Cold air can't hold as much water (vapor) as hot air. Keeping your apartment at 72 is not the problem. Drafty is the problem. What you are doing is bringing in cold dry air, heating it and humidifying it, and hoping to benefit from it before it leaks back out of the building. For this reason radiant heat would work better for you than forced air. (i didn't catch which you had) Caulking the windows was a good thing. With free heat you don't want to buy extra heat so you are kind of stuck with what the building has.
Some things from my first aid training and raising kids in the desert: In the winter warm liquids are important. Hot drinks and hot soup. It has a double benefit. You ingest the water, and you breath the vapor and steam as you eat. This really helps with that nose. But, caffeine dehydrates you. (sugar also) If you can cut back on it your personal hydration will improve. Also get your electrolytes. If you feel like you are drinking and peeing all the time but are still thirsty, you probably aren't getting your electrolytes. Like gatorade or powerade, especially the low calorie options. BTW the orange one tastes ok Warmed. (my grandmother would have thrown in a clove)
Came here to say something similar, and this is even better than what I was going to say.

You shouldn't need multiple humidifiers for 900 sq feet - you're obviously adding humidity to a lot bigger amount of air than than fills this space. This means you're transferring humid air out of your apartment, so focus there instead of another humidifier.

How about the doors, including doorways that lead to corridors or whatever in your building? You might be attempting to humidify a whole apartment building.

And watch the relative humidity - I've built up many inches of ice on some of our windows trying to keep things Mediterranean inside my house while it's effectively a frozen desert outside. Drink more.
 

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Oh, and my ex wife and I rented an apartment in a very old building while in university. We had all kinds of trouble with it. One of the things we did was offer to paint it if the owner paid for the paint.

The walls were so dry that it absorbed double the paint anybody thought it would. I think the walls were so old and dry that it was literally just pulling moisture right out of the air. Paint helped to seal it, maybe. Just anecdotal evidence, I have no data to show that it that actually helped.
 

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Came here to say something similar, and this is even better than what I was going to say.

You shouldn't need multiple humidifiers for 900 sq feet - you're obviously adding humidity to a lot bigger amount of air than than fills this space. This means you're transferring humid air out of your apartment, so focus there instead of another humidifier. [\QUOTE]

And Bingo was his Namo!

However, lots of landlords and property managers get PISSED if you make small changes to your apartment if they stumble across it.
 

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I live in the south and there's more than enough humidity in the summer and it always makes it a lot worse, so no. But at 900 square feet, two humidifiers should do you just fine.
 
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