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We adopted a great dog about a month ago. He was supposed to be house broken etc etc. he's over a year old. Well, our son loves the dog... But he is having accidents in the house and crating him is turning into a disaster. He has chewed our son's toys... While the sitter was with him. We can only control so much of this behavior. He can't stay outside because he barks and the neighbors complained.

I don't know what to do. I feel like the dog has to go back but my husband and son are completely against it. But they don't pick up the accidents! We've tried a dog trainer... So far.. Not much change.

Don't want to break our son's heart. But we lease the house and the carpet is taking a beating!
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Hes a puppy. They'll grow out of it. When you actually get to know the dog, you'll think of it as a furry child. My dog used to wreck everything, from flooring to books to shoes. Think of it as a sped up crash course of how destructive your son is going to be. Just a taste..
 

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As a rescue worker and an active foster mom for several dogs I can tell you that you have to stick with this commitment and give the dog longer than a month.

What have you done so far to train the dog?

I had a particularly unruly foster once...he was a monster to crate train.

Frozen kong treats will keep puppy occupied in the crate, food game toys will also work. if he's whining and crying in the crate,keep him in there until he stops crying...let him out ONLY when he is quiet and calmed down. Do this over and over,gradually increasing the time. it takes patience but he WILL get better I promise!

The housetraining thing doesn't have to be torture either. Since he is a rescue dog,you don't know truly what he has been through so no,a dog trainer might not be able to make a difference in just a few weeks time.
 

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You also have to remember that this is a puppy and in a relatively new environment.

Everyone has to take the dog out at regular intervals--whether he has to "go" or not. Everyone uses the same commands and disciplines the same way.

He needs to be consistently and sufficiently exercised. Especially as a young dog, if his energy isn't directed somewhere it will emerge to cause trouble. I'm guessing with a boy, you're familiar with this concept ;)

The dog toys and kid toys shouldn't be on the floor together and shouldn't be similar. The dog isn't going to be able to discern between HIS stuffed animal and your son's stuffed animal. If the dog toys are kept out and on the floor, then anything out and on the floor is fair game--especially during the chewing stage.

Having a dog is seriously like having a toddler in many ways and has to be trained and treated the same way.
 

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As a rescue worker and an active foster mom for several dogs I can tell you that you have to stick with this commitment and give the dog longer than a month.

What have you done so far to train the dog?

I had a particularly unruly foster once...he was a monster to crate train.

Frozen kong treats will keep puppy occupied in the crate, food game toys will also work. if he's whining and crying in the crate,keep him in there until he stops crying...let him out ONLY when he is quiet and calmed down. Do this over and over,gradually increasing the time. it takes patience but he WILL get better I promise!

The housetraining thing doesn't have to be torture either. Since he is a rescue dog,you don't know truly what he has been through so no,a dog trainer might not be able to make a difference in just a few weeks time.
This.

Also, sounds like he has alot of pent up energy...how often is he taken for a walk or exercised?
 

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You also have to remember that this is a puppy and in a relatively new environment.

Everyone has to take the dog out at regular intervals--whether he has to "go" or not. Everyone uses the same commands and disciplines the same way.

He needs to be consistently and sufficiently exercised. Especially as a young dog, if his energy isn't directed somewhere it will emerge to cause trouble. I'm guessing with a boy, you're familiar with this concept ;)

The dog toys and kid toys shouldn't be on the floor together and shouldn't be similar. The dog isn't going to be able to discern between HIS stuffed animal and your son's stuffed animal. If the dog toys are kept out and on the floor, then anything out and on the floor is fair game--especially during the chewing stage.

Having a dog is seriously like having a toddler in many ways and has to be trained and treated the same way.
:iagree::iagree:

and when the dog messes up, it isn't HIS fault. It's the human's fault.Sorry but it's true. I see too many people wanting to blame the animal instead of blaming themselves and the other people in the home for not properly guiding the dog. My shelter gets SO many dogs returned bc people aren't devoting enough time and energy to proper training.

Disciplining the dog will only make him hide what he's doing. Instead of pottying in the open,he'll do it somewhere that you won't notice til later.
Disciplining him for chewing the kids toys will only make him resentful and fearful.

Redirect his attention and give him a firm No when you catch him with the toys and give him one of his toys and immediately praise him when he chews on it.

The dog might have been housebroken in his original home. Doesn't mean he will carry that over to a new environment.
 

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the dog is not the problem, your training methods are

praise for GOOD behaviour works better than disipline for bad behaviour....keep the dog with you while home ALL THE TIME! if this means wrapping a leash around your waist then so be it, the dog comes everywhere you do! he will learn fast! you need to go out in the yard with the dog and PRAISE HIM for doing his business in the yard, this works better then disipline for going in the house, and yes it is alot of work and yes its hard, that is part of owning a dog

training a dog is not putting him out in the yard and letting hime figure it out for himself, you need to be out there with him, also walk him alot and praise him for doing his business on the walks
 

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sounds like a consistency issue to me.

make sure everyone has one of these handy to click and treat in order to reinforce good behavior (yes, just laying there doing nothing and relaxing is good behavior :) )



i miss my dog
 

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We adopted a german shepherd mix. She has sooo much energy and is a giant pain in the butt if we don't exersize her. It took a while to find the best method of potty training her as well. We found a mixture of crate training/bell ringing worked for her. Every time we took her outside we'd ring a little bell that hangs from our door handle. It wasn't long until she figured out she could go outside if she rang the bell. She took advantage of it for a while (we'd come inside and shed ring it 10 minutes later lol), but it lost its newness eventually and now she only uses it to go potty. If she REALLY has to go, she starts shaking the bell like she's lost her mind. LOL
As for chewing, we're stuck on that stage as well. We always have rawhides and bones around, but she really likes to tear up stuffed animals. Usually the more we walk in the mornings, the less destruction she'll do all day. :)
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I am not an advocate of crating. Dogs with anxiety don't improve with crating. To me that just masks the problem. Clearly your dog has two things going on - 1) not enough exercise and 2) too much anxiety. The exercise thing is pretty simple. Instead of letting your dog just be outside for long stretches of time it needs long periods of walking on the leash. I recommend 45 minutes twice a day. This should burn off excess energy. The second problem is harder - anxiety at what? Separation? Frustration? The mistake many people make is coddling a nervous dog. All you're doing is reinforcing nervous behavior. You need to be able to ignore the anxiety while directing the dog's attention to something else like constructive play, or other learning activities. A larger dog should be given a job to do like wearing a backpack to carry things, or if it's a water dog, retrieving things from the water, or pulling a wagon or what have you. Doesn't much matter as long as you give the animal a routine set of tasks. That's what constructive play is.

High functioning herding dogs like collies and shepherds can be given some agility training.

Hounds are altogether different. Hounds are stubborn and obsessive and follow their noses no matter what. If they're not given things to follow and smell they tend to get lazy. Note also you probably can't run a hound to exhaustion, particularly beagles. Can't be done.

Smaller dogs, under 30 lbs you could try enrolling in Canine Good Citizen training as a precursor to the training for therapy dogs or dogs used in hospitals or hospice care. CGC certification isn't that hard unless your dog is very strongly food motivated (like a hound). But in either case, giving a smaller dog a job like visiting veterans hospitals is a great way to give your dog a useful job.

For dogs smaller than that, I have nothing to suggest unless it's a terrier in the 8-15lb range. They all have OCD so if you want to throw a ball 4 million times, they'll do that. Under 8lbs...is that a dog?
 

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Youtube caesar millan .. start using those methods. First off, dogs go by successful behavoirs. It is not spite, itis not to piss you off. It is biological instincts.

If the dog is succesful in going to the bathroom in the house it is considered a successful behavoir regardless of reaction from you. You need to show the dog that certain behavoirs are NOT successful behavoirs. Start by blocking access to areas he goes bathroom in in the house. Take him to a specific backyard spot and say go potty. Repeat ad nauseum until he gets that this is expected successful behavoirs.

For crate training... with his personality ane age you may or may not be successful with crate training. As for toy chewing. Get him lots of dog toys and bones to chew and teach him the drop it command.

Depending on breed, clicker training may help.
 

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Don't give up on the dog. Get tough with your husband and son!

TONS of exercise. Re-arrange your schedules so the dog's day starts off with a long walk, bike ride, jog or roller-blade. Have everyone in the family take turns or choose one person to be responsible for this but get it done. This will help get rid of pent up energy before you leave for work/school so the dog will be less likely to want to entertain himself in destroying your home. The dog should also be walked again in the evening - especially if he was cooped up inside all day.

As for crate training, try to make the crate a positive place for your dog. Don't use the crate to punish. It needs to be his little cave and a place he feels good about - not a time-out chair or jail-cell. A good ritual when it comes to the crate is giving a certain treat before the dog goes into the crate. Have a nice blanket or cushion for him in the crate and a bone or toy to chew on. It sounds odd but lavender oil is a naturally soothing smell and it's safe for dogs so you might want to put some on its bedding. You might need to take time off to get the dog used to being in the crate for extended periods. First, you start off with short periods of time like fifteen to thirty minutes and as the dog learns to relax in there, you extend the length of time the dog is in the crate so that he can be in there for a few hours.

As for housebreaking, you need to get back to basics as if he was a puppy (he still is at one, most dogs aren't full grown until age three). When the dog eliminates inside, bring the poop or pee-soaked paper towels out in the yard to the spot where you'd like the dog to go to the bathroom. Bring the dog to the same smelly place frequently to eliminate throughout the day and give tons of praise when he does finally go where you want him to.

Also, make sure to thoroughly clean up any accidents inside the home. Just because your noses can no longer detect the smell of waste, doesn't mean the dog's nose can't and if he smells his waste in that spot, he's likely to return to that spot and eliminate. Rent or buy a carpet shampooer and use a neutralizing cleaner to make sure the smell is 100% gone.

The dog sounds bored. The kongs and dog puzzles suggested by ScarlettBegonias are also great ideas. They sell sprays to go on furniture legs, electrical cords etc. to deter chewing... those might also be useful to you. Redirect his chewing to toys and bones. I'd also suggest that in addition to obedience training to train tricks as well to keep the dog's mind busy. Having a trainer is a good idea but you all need to be repeating what the trainer does with the dog when he's home so that he'll listen to you as well.

You need to put your foot down with your husband and son when it comes to caring for and training the dog. It's not fair to you to have to do it on your own and it's not fair to the dog to be returned to the shelter because they are too unmotivated to help him. They should also be picking up after themselves so the dog has less access to things he shouldn't chew on.

You might also want to do some breed-specific activities with the dogs. I'm not sure what breed your dog is but most breeds were created for a purpose so they have specific behaviours that are in their nature. For instance, our Border Collie, always tried to "herd" us into the same room when we were home. Our beagle, loved to chase after small animals (we trained her out of this) like rabbits and squirrels. Doing activities with the dog that fulfill those needs should quell more boredom as well.

Last, I second reading/watching books and videos from Cesar Milan. He's great.
 
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Don't give up on the dog. Get tough with your husband and son!

TONS of exercise. Re-arrange your schedules so the dog's day starts off with a long walk, bike ride, jog or roller-blade. Have everyone in the family take turns or choose one person to be responsible for this but get it done. This will help get rid of pent up energy before you leave for work/school so the dog will be less likely to want to entertain himself in destroying your home. The dog should also be walked again in the evening - especially if he was cooped up inside all day.

As for crate training, try to make the crate a positive place for your dog. Don't use the crate to punish. It needs to be his little cave and a place he feels good about - not a time-out chair or jail-cell. A good ritual when it comes to the crate is giving a certain treat before the dog goes into the crate. Have a nice blanket or cushion for him in the crate and a bone or toy to chew on. It sounds odd but lavender oil is a naturally soothing smell and it's safe for dogs so you might want to put some on its bedding. You might need to take time off to get the dog used to being in the crate for extended periods. First, you start off with short periods of time like fifteen to thirty minutes and as the dog learns to relax in there, you extend the length of time the dog is in the crate so that he can be in there for a few hours.

As for housebreaking, you need to get back to basics as if he was a puppy (he still is at one, most dogs aren't full grown until age three). When the dog eliminates inside, bring the poop or pee-soaked paper towels out in the yard to the spot where you'd like the dog to go to the bathroom. Bring the dog to the same smelly place frequently to eliminate throughout the day and give tons of praise when he does finally go where you want him to.

Also, make sure to thoroughly clean up any accidents inside the home. Just because your noses can no longer detect the smell of waste, doesn't mean the dog's nose can't and if he smells his waste in that spot, he's likely to return to that spot and eliminate. Rent or buy a carpet shampooer and use a neutralizing cleaner to make sure the smell is 100% gone.

The dog sounds bored. The kongs and dog puzzles suggested by ScarlettBegonias are also great ideas. They sell sprays to go on furniture legs, electrical cords etc. to deter chewing... those might also be useful to you. Redirect his chewing to toys and bones. I'd also suggest that in addition to obedience training to train tricks as well to keep the dog's mind busy. Having a trainer is a good idea but you all need to be repeating what the trainer does with the dog when he's home so that he'll listen to you as well.

You need to put your foot down with your husband and son when it comes to caring for and training the dog. It's not fair to you to have to do it on your own and it's not fair to the dog to be returned to the shelter because they are too unmotivated to help him. They should also be picking up after themselves so the dog has less access to things he shouldn't chew on.

You might also want to do some breed-specific activities with the dogs. I'm not sure what breed your dog is but most breeds were created for a purpose so they have specific behaviours that are in their nature. For instance, our Border Collie, always tried to "herd" us into the same room when we were home. Our beagle, loved to chase after small animals (we trained her out of this) like rabbits and squirrels. Doing activities with the dog that fulfill those needs should quell more boredom as well.

Last, I second reading/watching books and videos from Cesar Milan. He's great.
I have two hybrid dogs. One is a border collie, husky, timber wolf mix. The other is a husky, red capacian wolf mix. The first dog herds big time and having wolf in them presents some interesting situations. We are in the process of discussing adopting a 7 yr old rhodesian ridgeback too. Well i am in the proces of begging lol
 

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As an owner of numerous Australian shepherds over the past 30 years, I can attest to the fact that even the most active dogs can be terrific house pets. Please give us more details.

Plenty of raw hide chewies are a must! I taught my Aussie's the command "drop it" when something was a forbidden object. Many times they were given a chewy for dropping a forbidden object. They soon learned what they couldn't have. Also, be aware that dogs tend to put THEIR items in a certain area (as in their "den"). Make sure that humans aren't leaving things in THEIR area. One of my daughter's had a very hard time with this concept. She continued to leave shoes, clothes, purses, papers, etc. in the dog's den area and couldn't understand why the puppy chewed them to bits. Once my daughter started putting her things up, the puppy didn't touch them.
 

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I agree with "Ceasar" comments, he also says "Not only do the dogs need training so do the owners". Our German Shepherd pup has just turned 12 mths, he's now our third, we have many ribbons for our first, but our second was the best, he came everywhere with us, very socialized but never showed. This fella is panning out great too, the whole family need to be on the same page for success, lot's of variety in chew toys, exercise, consistency, positive interaction, socializing & patience. Your body language also speaks volumes to a dog. Good luck, I also don't agree with crating.
 
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